Category Archives: Trusts

Vacation Check List

1. Pack swim suit 2. Stop the mail for the week. 3. Ask neighbors to water the flowers. 4. Review estate plan. – – – – Say What? Truthfully, all of us are aware that increased travel brings with it increased risk. Travel accidents occur every day, and we would not be doing our family justice should we neglect to insure that our affairs are in order before leaving for that long awaited vacation. Some concerns: Continue reading

Chronic Illness – Care of Your Person

Chronic Illness – Care of Your Person

If you have a chronic illness, your personal planning will need to involve careful consideration of your condition. Many Americans experience ALS disease, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis (MS) or other types of chronic diseases.

If you or a loved one has one of these conditions, it is important to communicate with your attorney and other advisors about your condition. There are specific planning options both during life and for your testamentary plan that should be considered. Continue reading

Planning for the Non-Traditional Family

By Robert M. Slutsky, Esq.

Robert Slutsky Associates

Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania, An ElderCare Matters Partner,

The percentage of married households in the United States fell from 55 percent in 1990 to 48 percent in 2010. About 40 percent of all marriages end in divorce. Three quarters of people who divorce remarry — accounting for a pretty large proportion of the 48 percent of American households that are married. Nearly 1.5 million babies a year are born to unmarried women, more than a third of all births. This can complicate matters, especially when the father is not identified or, in the case of donated sperm, does not exist. It also can mean a greater need for planning when there is no identified back-up parent if something happens to the mother. If you are in a relationship, but not married, have been married more than once, have children by more than one partner, or have beneficiaries who cannot manage funds for one reason or another, then it’s more important that you do estate planning. And you need more than LegalZoom to accomplish your goals. Continue reading

Helping Children Tomorrow

Parents and children often have a different perspective on saving and spending. Parents of retirement age today were born during the Great Depression or during the 1940s and have a strong desire to save and invest in order to increase economic security.

Some of their children may have a different perspective. Because their children did not grow up during adverse economic times, they tend to consume more and save less. Understandably, many of these parents hope that their children could have greater economic security during retirement. Continue reading

Trusts for Creative Spenders

Trusts can be quite useful for protecting children. However, for some children, the trust serves an additional function: It protects the principal from being rapidly spent by a child. These trusts have a specific name—they are called “spendthrift” trusts. Marla was visiting with her attorney Elizabeth shortly after her husband Harry passed away. She shared her concern for her youngest child, Joe.  Marla: “Harry and I were very fortunate to have four great children. I love each one of them very much. However, when it comes time to making decisions about inheritance, I have a big problem. Our older children Sam and Linda are quite good with financial matters. The third child Lynn is average, but our youngest son Joe is very carefree. If Joe has money, it is gone in a flash. What can I do?” Elizabeth: “This is a fairly common situation. Many parents would like to treat their children equally, but some children are very good managers and one or two are not. In your case, we hope that Joe eventually learns to become more responsible. But for the present plan, it makes good sense to provide Joe with spendthrift trust provisions.” Continue reading