Tag Archives: emotional

When Is the Right Time to Seek Memory Care for Mom?

Sometimes, it’s hard for those closest to us to recognize when it’s time for a change, and it can be harder still for our loved ones to talk to us about that necessary change. You may have noticed a few changes in Mom lately, and maybe you have started to wonder if it’s time to seek out memory care for her. Continue reading

Tips for Having “The Talk” with Mom about Assisted Living

As an outside observer, often times, it is the child who first notices changes in Mom that signal it may be time for her to move to an assisted living community. How will she react? How should you bring it up? Knowing what to say and how to begin can be the most difficult part of the entire conversation. So here are a few tips to help you talk with Mom about moving to an assisted living community. Continue reading

How to Divvy Up Your Stuff

What’s the best, conflict-free way to divvy up my personal possessions amongst my kids after I’m gone? I have jewelry, art, family heirlooms, antique furniture and five grown kids that don’t always see eye-to-eye. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Divvying up personal possessions amongst adult children or other loved ones is a task that many parents dread. Deciding who should get what without showing favoritism, hurting someone’s feelings or causing a feud can be difficult even for close-knit families who enter the process with the best of intentions. Here are some tips to consider that can help you divide your possessions with minimal conflict. Continue reading

Identifying and Avoiding Caregiver Burnout

By: Henry C. Weatherby, Esq., CLU, ChFC, CEBS

Many of our clients are caring for or being cared for by a loved one. More than 65 million Americans care for family members who need assistance due to chronic conditions, disabilities, disease, or the frailties of old age. These millions of family caregivers may include spouses, parents, or children of the person receiving care. Even when family members are not providing direct care themselves, they are often still the ones who arrange for and manage the care their loved ones need. These people are still part of the caregiving team and share in the emotional and financial stresses that can result from being a caregiver. Caregivers are often so focused on the needs of the person for whom they are caring that they forget to care for themselves. This puts them at risk for caregiver burnout.

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