Tag Archives: STATE

Transferring Assets and the Five Year Look-back

When an individual applies for Medicaid assistance in a nursing home, one of the first questions that is asked of them has to do with whether a transfer has been made of any asset for less than fair market values within five years (60 months) of the date of the application.  If such a transfer has been made, a “penalty period” will result depending on the value of the gift.  The larger the gift, the longer the penalty period.  Continue reading

3 Ways Caregivers Can Get Financial Assistance

If you are a caregiver looking for financial assistance, there are several programs that may be able to help you. While you will still have to pay some out-of-pocket, taking advantage of these services can help you reduce the amount that you are personal spending on caregiving. Here are three ways you can get financial help. Continue reading

Medicaid Protections for the Healthy Spouse

Medicaid law provides special protections for the spouses of Medicaid applicants to make sure the spouses have the minimum support needed to continue to live in the community while their husband or wife is receiving long-term care benefits, usually in a nursing home. Continue reading

The Best Way to Help a Grandchild with College

A college education — even at a highly rated private institution — was once regarded as a relatively affordable route to lifelong prosperity, but in recent years it has become a hobbling financial burden for many families. As a result, older generations are often stepping up to help their families with college funding. Continue reading

The Consequences of Dying Without A Will

What will happen to my money and possessions if I die without a will?
If you die without a will, what happens to your assets will be determined by the state in which you reside. Every state has intestacy laws in place that parcel out property and assets to a deceased person’s closest relatives when there’s no will or trust. Keep in mind these laws vary from state to state. A good resource to help you find out how your state works is About.com’s Wills and Estate Planning site, which provides a state-by-state breakdown of how your estate would be distributed if you die without a will. See StateIntestacyLaws.com for a direct link to this page. In the meantime, here is a general (not state specific) breakdown of what can happen to a person’s assets, depending on whom they leave behind. Continue reading