Tag Archives: survivor

Caring for Minor Children

“Who would take our children? I am not sure anyone would be willing to take them,” remarked Shelly to her attorney, Jim. “It’s not that they aren’t good children. They are all fine, but there are 11 of them! If something happens to Pat and me, who will take them?” Continue reading

Financial Considerations for Remarrying Later in Life

What are the financial issues that come with remarrying later in life? I’ve been seeing a wonderful man for two years, and we’ve been talking about marriage, but I want to make sure we understand all the possible financial consequences before getting hitched.

That’s a great question. Getting remarried later in life can actually bring about a host of financial and legal issues that are much different and more complicated than they are for younger couples just starting out. Here are some common problem areas you need to think about, as well as some tips and resources that can help. Continue reading

Ten Reasons You Should Update Your Estate Plan

You have completed a will and perhaps a revocable living trust. Your durable power of attorney for healthcare and a living will are accompanied by a HIPAA release. All of your records are safely in place and carefully organized.

So you now are finished with your estate planning. Or are you? Will there be changes in your circumstances or your family that should lead to a review of your plan? Could some events cause you to need to revise or update the plan? Continue reading

Trusts for Creative Spenders

Trusts can be quite useful for protecting children. However, for some children, the trust serves an additional function: It protects the principal from being rapidly spent by a child. These trusts have a specific name—they are called “spendthrift” trusts. Marla was visiting with her attorney Elizabeth shortly after her husband Harry passed away. She shared her concern for her youngest child, Joe.  Marla: “Harry and I were very fortunate to have four great children. I love each one of them very much. However, when it comes time to making decisions about inheritance, I have a big problem. Our older children Sam and Linda are quite good with financial matters. The third child Lynn is average, but our youngest son Joe is very carefree. If Joe has money, it is gone in a flash. What can I do?” Elizabeth: “This is a fairly common situation. Many parents would like to treat their children equally, but some children are very good managers and one or two are not. In your case, we hope that Joe eventually learns to become more responsible. But for the present plan, it makes good sense to provide Joe with spendthrift trust provisions.” Continue reading